en
en
Main | Art magazine | The Virgin of Orleans and the sins of the English court in the paintings of the academician Paul Delaroche
Back
The Virgin of Orleans and the sins of the English court in the paintings of the academician Paul Delaroche

The Virgin of Orleans and the sins of the English court in the paintings of the academician Paul Delaroche

Share on social networks:

Paul Delaroche (1797-1859) was a French artist who painted paintings on historical subjects in the style of academism, which were in great demand by his contemporaries. There was every reason for this - a good academic education - Delaroche graduated from the Paris School of Fine Arts, and after six years of diligent study, finally presented at the Salon his first painting. It was received kindly, but without much enthusiasm - the first test of strength of a novice artist, writes seemingly correctly, but the experience and ease of brush yet lacks, we'll see what happens next. And then there was a painting "Sick Joan of Arc is questioned in prison by Cardinal Winchester", which immediately made a sensation.

The sick Joan of Arc is interrogated in prison by Cardinal of Winchester

Delaroche's portrayal of the heroine and martyr is convincing. Although exhausted, Joan is not broken, still sincerely believes in her special destiny and is surely ready to inspire the French army to fight against the English again, as she did during the siege of Orleans. At that time, she repeatedly had visions of angels, believed in her special role in history and gained an audience with King Charles VII. The moment for France was very difficult, the English were clearly gaining the upper hand, and the disparate French lacked an idea and a symbol that would unite them. But there were tales of a virgin who could save France. The king decided that Jeanne is just the perfect candidate for that mythical virgin-savior, it remains only to play this trump card in his favor.

A young girl in a shell

Jeanne had to endure a humiliating vetting procedure, and after that she became the leader of a French army that unsuccessfully tried to help the besieged Orleans. Nine days later, French soldiers, inspired by Jeanne's incendiary speeches, helped lift the siege, won a number of other fleeting victories, and Charles VII could be crowned in Reims.

Only three years later, the 19-year-old Joan was betrayed by her English allies, the Burgignons, and handed over to the English Inquisition. She had to go through torture and grueling interrogations, one of which and depicted Delaroche. Jeanne from his did not give up and was burned at the stake. However, 25 years later she was given the status of a martyr and saint, and Napoleon Bonaparte, desperate for new heroes, declared her a national symbol of France.

Portrait of Napoleon Bonaparte.

No less tragic plot is depicted in the painting "Edward's Children". Here the boys can only sympathize - they became a bargaining chip in the struggle for power and their uncle, Lord Richard, who became, due to the minority of the legitimate King Edward V of England, his guardian and regent, decided to seize the English throne and ordered to put the boys who were very much in his way in the Tower, and then quietly do away with them.

Edward's children

The painting depicts this moment when the poor children, Edward V and his younger brother, are sitting in an empty room guarded by guards, probably already guessing their unhappy fate. But what can they do against the insidious plan of their uncle, who in the pursuit of power is ready for the most terrible crimes?

In 1553, after the six-year reign of Edward VI, or rather, his regents, since Edward VI formally came to the throne at the age of 9, England was bad. Economic problems were exacerbated by hostilities in Scotland and popular uprisings. And Edward VI himself fell ill and died at the age of 15, declaring his favorite cousin Lady Jane Grey heir to the throne before his death. Only the noble feudal lords did not recognize her as queen, rebelled, and Mary Tudor replaced her on the throne.

The execution of Lady Jane Grey

Lady Jane Grey herself was imprisoned in the Tower. Even her tender age of only 16 was no barrier to the torture, after which she was blinded and executed. Delaroche depicted this tragic moment in the painting, and it is because of the blindness and torture Jane Grey is wearing a bandage. However, Delaroche was an academic, so the painting is as softened as possible, naturalistic details are minimal, aesthetics rule the ball, but it still makes a strong impression, especially if you know the preface.


Buy handmade goods or modern art you can on artAlebrio - is an international marketplace for people who want to create, sell, buy and collect unique items and art - buy the best with us artAlebrio.com.

We in social media

Tg, FB, Instagram

Back
Share on social networks:
Товар добавлен в корзину!